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VMWARE GSX

 
Sac_3
Frequent Advisor

VMWARE GSX

Hi Techies,

Firstly i would like to thank each one of you for helping people in solving their issues and sharing your knoweldge. I am new to this forum and have a question

I would like to practise Veritas Volume manager on Redhat AS 4. So i installed VMWARE GSX application in my notebook.

I have created two instances of Redhat AS 4 and installed Veritas Volume Manager 4.Now inorder to practise VXVM i would like to know how to share a common storage for the two instances so that i can import and deport DG's. Hope i am clear, if not please let me know.

So, I would like to know if this can b done on VMWARE GSX server or not? If yes how?

Thanks in advance
5 REPLIES
Rob Leadbeater
Honored Contributor

Re: VMWARE GSX

Hi,

I'm not too sure on the answer to your question, but is there any reason you've chosen to use VMware GSX over a more recent version of VMware ?

Cheers,

Rob
Sac_3
Frequent Advisor

Re: VMWARE GSX

Hi Rob!

Thx for your prompt reply. Yes.Becuase i know that i cannot achieve this using VMWARE workstation. Next using VMWARE ESX is irrelevant. I heard that we can share a common storage in VMWARE GSX server so i installed it. Not sure if VMWARE Server version has this feature.

Regards,
SaC
Rob Leadbeater
Honored Contributor

Re: VMWARE GSX

Well VMware Server is the replacement for GSX, so if it can be done in GSX, then I would have thought it can with VMware Server...

Cheers,

Rob
Sac_3
Frequent Advisor

Re: VMWARE GSX

Ok! may i know the procedure for sharing the storage/disk in VMWARE Server edition.
Serviceguard for Linux
Honored Contributor

Re: VMWARE GSX

Sharing storage has two possible meanings in VMware server. In one case you create a disk, which is really a file on the disk (both VMs need to be on the same server in that instance). In the other case you are sharing a real "physical" disk.

For the first case (disk is implemented as a file) here is a "step by step.
Be aware that this disk can only be accessed by one server at a time (no clustered file systems).

If you have problems do s google search of:
persistent independent site:vmware.com

This search should pick up some of the examples this work is based on.

â ¢ Each virtual server has a â definitionâ file. Each virtual server has a sub-directory in the â Virtual Serversâ directory (assuming that defaults are selected). Each directory is named the same as the server. Within that directory is a file, again with the name as a base, with a â .vmxâ extension. First, make sure the virtual servers are powered off. Before adding any extra disks add the following lines to the server â .vmxâ files (both servers). Watch for typos, especially on the last line since it is slightly different.

scsi1.present = "TRUE"
scsi1.virtualDev = "lsilogic"
scsi1.sharedBus = "virtual"
disk.locking = "FALSE"

â ¢ Note the â lsilogicâ assumes that scsi0 is also â lsilogicâ

â ¢ Edit virtual machine Node1
â Add
â Hard disk
â Create new virtual disk
â ¢ SCSI
â ¢ Size
â ¢ When it asked for disk file I suggest the following:
Use a different directory than the servers (I suggest at the â serverâ level). Use the â .vmdkâ extension. For example: shares/share1.vmdk
â ¢ Before selecting Finished â select Advanced (this is important)
â Select a SCSI address with scsi1:x (recommend 1 for first disk, etc).
â Select â independentâ (persistent will be selected by default)
â Select â Finishedâ - A disk will now be created.
â ¢
â ¢ Edit the â .vmxâ file (again) and you will find â independent-persistentâ listed for the new disk. Make this be â persistentâ .
â Each disk should have the following entries:
scsi1:x.present = â trueâ
scsi1:x.filename = â this will be the pathâ
scsi1:x.mode = â persistentâ â
scsi1:x.deviceType = â plainDiskâ
â
â ¢ For the second machine do the same except select the â use an existing diskâ . Everything else is the same. Make sure you select the same SCSI identifier for the disk, e.g. 1:1