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bootable disk replacement

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Roro_2
Regular Advisor

bootable disk replacement

Hello,

Our customer had an rp4440 server running HPUX 11i v1 (2005).
The primary and alternate bootable disks (2x73GB) are mirrored using MirrorDisk software.
The customer wants to replace the above disks by 2x 300GB disks (P/N: AD263A)without re-installing HPUX from scratch.
What is the safest and fastest procedure to replace the disks and extend the file systems containing data.

Thanks and Regards

Roger
10 REPLIES
freddy_21
Respected Contributor

Re: bootable disk replacement

I think the safe way is ignite.

backup your OS with make_tape_recovery ( if you have dds tape). and restore to 300 GB disk.

after restore complete. you must do mirror for new disk.


Regards
Freddy
Michal Kapalka (mikap)
Honored Contributor

Re: bootable disk replacement

hi,

the safest way is to make it from ignite tape/server ( install the new configuration to the new disks )

it could be done online, there is a procedure for this, but you need to destroy the mirror, and from the time you will have SPOF on the HW level ( disks will be not mirrored. ), this procedure isn't officially supported be HP.


mikap
Viney Kumar
Regular Advisor

Re: bootable disk replacement

Hi Roro,

me not much aware about MirrorDisk software specified. But in gerneral senario you can break the mirror and remove the alternate disk then you can insert new disk (300gb) and recreate the mirror. Once shink will be completed you can try to boot the system with alternative disk.

If system boot up properly so you can try same thing with primary disk.

Please note:- file system size remain same.


Viney
Michal Kapalka (mikap)
Honored Contributor

Re: bootable disk replacement

hi,

check this link, if you like to extend some file systems online.

http://www.symmetricwebsites.com/articles/HP-UX/hpuxDynamicallyExtendSlashAndOrStand.php

mikap
R.K. #
Honored Contributor

Re: bootable disk replacement

Hi Roro,

Best way to do these is ignite. Take ignite backup and restore on the one of the new disks, verfiy and then mirror it to other new disk.
Don't fix what ain't broke
Roro_2
Regular Advisor

Re: bootable disk replacement

Hi,

1- Using tape drive :
- should i break the mirroring
- in case we did not break the mirroring
could i restore the backup to new disk
, extend some file systems and mirror
the second new disk.

2- No tape drive :
- how can i copy the current disk to new
new disks.
- should i break the mirroring status

Regards

Roger
Michal Kapalka (mikap)
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: bootable disk replacement

Hi,

1- Using tape drive :
- should i break the mirroring
- in case we did not break the mirroring
could i restore the backup to new disk
, extend some file systems and mirror
the second new disk.

if yuo have a tape drive, make a backup to tape, don;t break the mirror, shutdown the server, remove the old original disks, and put there the new 300 GB disks, boot from tape, and use advanced tape of installation.

If you need to make some FS resize changes, you can do it, ( don't orget use only one disk ) and them start the restoration, after the system will be restored, boot the new installed OS from the disk, check the installation, /etc/rc.log ..... use swverify \*, to see if all parts of SW are in good confition. and them mirror the system to the second disk.


2- No tape drive :
- how can i copy the current disk to new
new disks.
- should i break the mirroring status

plan a downtime for the system, shutdown all app, and them you could break the mirror, lvreduce / vgreduce, and them add your new disk and remirror it.

mikap

Regards

Roger
Javed Khan_1
Valued Contributor

Re: bootable disk replacement

Ok you may try this

c1t1d0 free disk as an example

1. Create a new VG vgroot with c1t1d0:
# pvcreate -B /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0 (donâ t forget the â B option!)
# mkdir /dev/vgroot
# ll /dev/*/group (check for unused minor number)
# mknod /dev/vgroot/group c 64 0x010000
# vgcreate vgroot /dev/dsk/c1t1d0
2. Create LVs for boot, swap and root (in that order). Use at least the same size as in
your original root VG:
# lvcreate -C y -r n vgroot
# lvextend -L 100 /dev/vgroot/lvol1 (e.g. 100 MB for /stand)
# lvcreate -C y -r n vgroot
# lvextend -L 512 /dev/vgroot/lvol2 (e.g. 512 MB pri. swap)
# lvcreate -C y -r n vgroot
# lvextend -L 200 /dev/vgroot/lvol3 (e.g. 200 MB for /)
3. Configure LIF and BDRA on c1t1d0 (see the LIF/BDRA Configuration Procedure).
4. Create LVs for /usr, /opt, /var, /tmp, /etc, /home, etc. Use at least the same size
as in your original root VG:
# lvcreate vgroot
# lvextend -L 500 /dev/vgroot/lvol4
...
5. Create the file systems:
# newfs -F hfs /dev/vgroot/rlvol1
# newfs -F vxfs /dev/vgroot/rlvol3
# newfs -F vxfs /dev/vgroot/rlvol4
...
6. Mount the file systems:
# mkdir /new_root /new_usr /new_stand â ¦ (Create mount points)
# mount /dev/vgroot/lvol1 /new_stand
# mount /dev/vgroot/lvol3 /new_root
# mount /dev/vgroot/lvol4 /new_usr
...
7. Copy the data, e.g. using find(1) with cpio(1):
# cd /
# find . -xdev -depth | cpio -pvdlmax /new_root
# cd /stand
# find . -xdev -depth | cpio -pvdlmax /new_stand
# cd /usr
# find . -xdev -depth | cpio -pvdlmax /new_usr
...
Chapter 16 LVM
July 2003 Chapter 16 / Page 39
8. Modify the fstab in /new_root/etc. Replace occurences of vg00 with vgroot:
# vi /new_root/etc/fstab
/dev/vgroot/lvol1 /stand hfs defaults 0 0 (new boot LV)
/dev/vgroot/lvol3 / vxfs delaylog 0 0 (new root LV)
/dev/vgroot/lvol4 /usr vxfs delaylog 0 0 (new /usr LV)
9. Change the device files for the root disk in /stand/bootconf to c1t1d0:
# vi /stand/bootconf
l /dev/dsk/c1t1d0
10. Configure disk c1t1d0 as boot path in stable storage and boot from it:
# setboot -b
# shutdown -r 0
11. When the system comes up again, backup vgrootâ s LVM Configuration:
# vgcfgbackup vgroot
12. And finally remove the old root VG if desired:
# vgchange -a n vg00
# vgexport vg00
If you like to rename vgroot to vg00:
1. Boot to LVM maintenance mode:
ISL> hpux â lm
2. Export vgroot and import it as vg00:
# vgexport vgroot
# mkdir /dev/vg00
# mknod /dev/vg00/group c 64 0x000000 (we import vg00 with minor 0)
# vgimport vg00 /dev/dsk/c1t1d0
3. Activate vg00 and mount the files ystems:
# vgchange -a y vg00
# mount /dev/vg00/lvol3 /
# mount /dev/vg00/lvol1 /stand
# mount /dev/vg00/lvol4 /usr
...
Chapter 16 LVM
July 2003 Chapter 16 / Page 40
4. Modify the fstab. Replace vgroot with vg00 again:
# vi /etc/fstab
5. Reboot:
# shutdown -r 0
Never Give Up
Roro_2
Regular Advisor

Re: bootable disk replacement

Hi Javed,

Thank you very much for your concern.

Could you tell me how to configure LIF and BDRA on the new disk.

Regards

Roger
R.K. #
Honored Contributor

Re: bootable disk replacement

HI Roger,

1. Write LIF header and LIF files (ISL, AUTO, HPUX, LABEL):
# mkboot -l /dev/rdsk/cXtXdX
# lifls -l /dev/rdsk/cXtXdX


2. Write content of AUTO File:
# mkboot -a hpux /dev/rdsk/cXtXdX
# mkboot -a "hpux -lq" /dev/rdsk/cXtXdX
# lifcp /dev/rdsk/cXtXdX:AUTO -



3. Write content of LABEL file, i.e set root, boot, swap and dump device:
To be sure to have the latest information on the disk just do the
following steps.
# lvlnboot -r /dev//lvol3
# lvlnboot -b /dev//lvol1
# lvlnboot -s /dev//lvol2
# lvlnboot -d /dev//lvol2
# lvlnboot -v (to ckeck it)
Don't fix what ain't broke