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how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

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Stan Sieler
Respected Contributor

how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

Hi,

How do I determine if a in-use file system supports
large files (other than by trying, which
isn't foolproof for at least two reasons)?

mount -v and fstyp -v don't seem to agree.
(Some HP docs imply that ftyp's "f_flags: 16"
means "largefiles", but I've got one 11.11
system with 3 file systems: two have flags of
16, one has flags of 0. mount -v only says that one of the flags 16 systems has largefiles :)

(And, fstyp's f_size appears to
refer to the size of the entire file system,
not to a maximum file size.)

fsadm reports two of our 3 filesystems
as largefile capable ... BUT ... man fsadm
says that it can't be used for all file
systems. (For some, the file system
must be unmounted, which renders the
command useless to me.)

thanks,

Stan
sieler@allegro.com

 

P.S. This thread has been moved from HP-UX Technical Documentation to HP-UX > sysadmin. -HP Forum Moderator

7 REPLIES
Slawomir Gora
Honored Contributor

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

Ranjith_5
Honored Contributor

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

Hi Stan,

See the command fstype with -v option.

root-/>fstyp -v dev/vg14/lvol1

vxfs
version: 4
f_bsize: 8192
f_frsize: 8192
f_blocks: 5241856
f_bfree: 4215122
f_bavail: 4215122
f_files: 16928
f_ffree: 2080311888
f_favail: 2080311888
f_fsid: 1074659329
f_basetype: vxfs
f_namemax: 254
f_magic: a501fcf5
f_featurebits: 0
f_flag: 16
f_fsindex: 7
f_size: 5241856

here see the flag value is 16 that means large file is enabled. Otherwise the f_flag value will be zero.

Regards,
Syam
Stan Sieler
Respected Contributor

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

thanks...

I have two problems with the first two
answers above:

fstyp -v

I've found *NO* manuals or /usr/include
files that document the f_flags values/bits.
I'd strongly prefer to find such before
assuming that 16 (is that bit 16, or
the value 0x10, or ?) is *documented*
as "largefile support".

fsadm

As I originally said, the man page says you
cannot use it on just any file system ...
some file systems work only if they are
unmounted. This renders it useless to
me for this purpose.

thanks.
Ranjith_5
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

Hi,

See the following doc.

http://docs.hp.com/en/B9106-90009/statvfs.2.html

see the possible return types for f_flag.
They are
ST_LARGEFILES File system is enabled for large files.

ST_RDONLY File system is read-only.

ST_NOSUID File system does not support setuid and setgid semantics.

ST_EXPORTED File system is exported (NFS).

ST_QUOTA Quotas are enabled on this file system.



Regards,
Syam
Andy Torres
Trusted Contributor

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

ls /dev/vg00/rlvol* | while read FS
do
RESULT=`fsadm -F vxfs $FS 2>&1`
echo "Filesystem $FS = $RESULT"
done

... gives me this result:

Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol1 = vxfs fsadm: not a valid vxfs file system
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol2 = vxfs fsadm: not a valid vxfs file system
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol3 = nolargefiles
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol4 = largefiles
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol5 = largefiles
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol6 = largefiles
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol7 = largefiles
Filesystem /dev/vg00/rlvol8 = largefiles

Hope that helps.
Stan Sieler
Respected Contributor

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

Syam...thanks, that's the doc I needed!
Full points!

Andy, as you probably have seen by now,
fsadm isn't an adequate tool ... there are
too many cases where it won't work.
Points for trying.
Stan Sieler
Respected Contributor

Re: how to accurately determine if an in-use file system supports large files

Syam's statvfs() does it for me.

Just noticed I hadn't officially closed the thread ...
doing so now because HP's odd/weird ITRC software
just sent me a notice that the thread had been
updated (on 2011-05-24) ... and it hadn't been.
Perhaps closing the thread will prevent similar
erroneous emails from HP :)

thanks,
Stan