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linux OS issue

dawn_jose85
Frequent Advisor

linux OS issue

I hardbooted the server.Then system went down .Then i had given fsck with a bootable cd
After giving fsck with bootable CD the system is showing the output as below in multiuser mode.

WARNING:

This is a private computer system and should only be accessed by authorised
users. If you do not have prior authorisation to access this system you must
disconnect immediately or face criminal prosecution for attempting to gain
confidential information through unauthorised access.


(none) login:

If we give the password then it is just erasing the entered login name without showing even any error message


If we enter in Single user mode it is showing the error as "SELinux:Disabled at runtime"
6 REPLIES
Elmar P. Kolkman
Honored Contributor

Re: linux OS issue

Apperently your system has lost things like it's hostname etc. (It is called 'none' now). Could it be that you used something like NIS or LDAP for authentication? And DHCP for the hostname/IP address? In that case, check your network connection...

As for the system not showing a login or shell in Single User mode: it looks like the getty lines are gone for the single usermode inittab entries....
Every problem has at least one solution. Only some solutions are harder to find.
dawn_jose85
Frequent Advisor

Re: linux OS issue

If we login via single user mode it is showing as "SELinux:Disabled at runtime" and got stuck in that cursor.

After hardboot done , then it is showing the same error message both in single and multi user modes.
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: linux OS issue

"SELinux: Disabled at runtime" is not an error message, but an informational one.

If the kernel has been compiled with the SELinux feature enabled (like most distributions' standard kernels are), this message is displayed at boot time if SELinux has been switched off.

In single user mode, there may be no syslogd/klogd running, so the kernel messages will be displayed directly on the system console. They may in some cases hide/overwrite the single-user login prompt. Try pressing Enter once or twice when booting into single user mode to re-display the prompt.

It might be that the problem affects the early phases of the boot-up sequence, and makes even the normal entry to the single user mode impossible. In that case, you might try booting the system using the rescue mode of the Linux installation CD/DVD.

As Elmar said, your system seems to have lost at least some configuration files. I hope you have some good back-ups available, or at least know/have documented the correct configuration for this system.

Without knowing the name and version of your Linux distribution, it's going to be very difficult to give exact instructions for recovery. Could you please identify your Linux distribution?

MK
MK
dawn_jose85
Frequent Advisor

Re: linux OS issue

My Linux version is
Linux vps211 2.6.9-78.ELsmp #1 SMP Wed Jul 9 15:46:26 EDT 2008 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Is there any other solution other than restoration of OS, since there is no back up available for the system.Avilable backup is Old, it is of Aug 2009. Can i restore root ,boot partitions ? Is there any problem with that? Is any configuration will loose if i do this process
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: linux OS issue

By the kernel version number, I can tell you have RedHat Enterprise Linux 4, or possibly CentOS. (That's the information I was looking for: with that, I know how your network configuration is stored in /etc, among other things.)

Restoring the boot partition is probably not necessary: if it had failed, your boot wouldn't go nearly as far as it does now.

Restoring the entire root filesystem might be overkill if you're only lost some small files. By the symptoms, you've lost at least some files from /etc/sysconfig. If that's all, it should be easy enough to fix.

You might want to restore the /etc directory from your old backup to some temporary location (e.g. /tmp/etc), or to a removable media, like a USB memory stick. Then start comparing the files you currently have in your /etc/sysconfig to the old files in the backup.

I think one of the files you've lost is /etc/sysconfig/network: it is used to configure the hostname of your system. This would explain why your login prompt is now "(none) login:".

You might also want to look into /lost+found: if the fsck finds salvageable files from a corrupted directory, it will store them to /lost+found with an auto-generated name. Each file you find in /lost+found has gone missing from its proper location. Some files may have been completely lost, so you cannot rely on finding all the missing files in lost+found.

If you see a large number of files in lost+found, you'll know your root filesystem was pretty severely damaged. In that case, you might consider more drastic recovery options, like restoring the entire root filesystem from the old backup, or even salvaging whatever important data you can find, then reinstalling the system.

MK
MK
dawn_jose85
Frequent Advisor

Re: linux OS issue

How can i do disaster recovery for the RHEL 4 64 bit OS