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multipath bindings

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naths
Occasional Contributor

multipath bindings

what happens when we use
/sbin/multipath -d -v1. what should be the exact output?.
3 REPLIES
Court Campbell
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: multipath bindings

Well if you read the man page you would see that -d is for dry-run. And -v1 is for the verbosity level. SO basically it just spits out output without doing anything. Here is some sample output.

# multipath -d -v1
mpath0
"The difference between me and you? I will read the man page." and "Respect the hat." and "You could just do a search on ITRC, you don't need to start a thread on a topic that's been answered 100 times already." Oh, and "What. no points???"
naths
Occasional Contributor

Re: multipath bindings

Hi Campbell,

I was working on 4 node RAC. On one of the nodes. I partitioned 44 disks using sfdisk command. And then renamed them according to our company policies. Then I ran multipath -d -v1 it showed me different mpaths than the mpaths which I renamed. Is that ok. After which I ran multipath -v1 command. Now I'm unable to see the partitions on those devices and it created new mpath in /etc/multipath_bindings file. Any clues why this has happened?.
Randy Jones_3
Trusted Contributor

Re: multipath bindings

> Any clues why this has happened?

It worked as designed. Running the multipath command caused a scan and (re)building of the path maps. Since you had set up the devices those apparently new paths were assigned new "mpath" tags in the bindings file. If you're setting up a new system and want to start over on mpath naming, just remove the bindings file and run the multipath command again. Similarly, if there are old path listings you know will never return you could edit out those lines.