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query on top and mount command

 
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iinfi1
Super Advisor

query on top and mount command

we have two itanium systems running suse10 which hosts two nodes of Oracle 10g rac.
below is a screenshot which shows node1 on the left and node 2 on the right.
http://img836.imageshack.us/img836/7519/topmount.jpg

storage is eva 4400
the screenshot is taken a little after production hrs. from the output of the top command do u think the memory is getting swapped a lot and we should increase the memory or go for an additional RAC node.
further the output of the mount command shows, that all the mountpoints are block devices and not LVMs. Would it be better if they were LVMs instead of simple block devices formatted as ext3 and OCFS2, as LVMs would mean we can resize them dynamically?
7 REPLIES
Ivan Ferreira
Honored Contributor

Re: query on top and mount command

From the output of the top command, is hard to say if the system is swapping. You should provide the output of the vmstat command to identify if there is si (swap in) and so (swap out).

For the operating system, probably it's good idea to use LVM, but hard to change at this time.

You cannot use OCFS2 with LVM without a cluster software that provides a Clusterized LVM.
Por que hacerlo dificil si es posible hacerlo facil? - Why do it the hard way, when you can do it the easy way?
iinfi1
Super Advisor

Re: query on top and mount command

hi ivan thanks for the insight.
i v attached a vmstat command screenshot on both nodes. i am reading some docs online to understand it. can you also plz throw more light on it?
iinfi1
Super Advisor

Re: query on top and mount command

attached is the output of more detailed vmstat.
vmstat 5 10
does this help in deciphering anything? i m still a noob :(
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: query on top and mount command

Resizing shared filesystems in a RAC environment can be tricky; on-line resizing may have some limitations. It may be safer to extend the databases by adding more disk devices.

You seem to be using Oracle ASM (oracleasmfs in your mount listings), which implies some data may be stored on ASM-controlled raw disk devices, and not at all visible as filesystems.

During the time you ran the last vmstat, the "so" column was mostly zeroes = no page-out activity. The two non-zero values were 1 and 2 = very very minor page-out activity.

The "si" column includes things other than swapping/paging (e.g. reading a memory-mapped file), so it's less useful. But that column is also mostly zeroes.

The percentage numbers in the "cpu" group indicate the system is mostly idle: the "id" column is almost constantly over 90%. (Note that the column titles are shifted because of the large numbers in the "memory" group.) The values in the "wa" column are all very small, so the system is not spending significant time in waiting for other things (usually network or disk I/O) to happen.

Run vmstat over your entire production hours (or the busiest time, if you can determine it). Then import the output into a spreadsheet (Excel or equivalent) and have it draw some graphs for you.

Ideally, the "so" column should be mostly zeroes: small non-zero bumps are OK, huge spikes may be a problem. Long segments of non-zero "so" are usually symptoms of a shortage of RAM, even if the values are not so huge.

Graphing the columns of the "cpu" group could be useful too: "us" is userspace work, which is usually your "payload". "id" is idle time: if this goes very low when users are complaining about slowness, more CPUs might be helpful. If the "wa" column dominates the results at the times of peak workload, you might have an I/O bottleneck somewhere.

MK
MK
iinfi1
Super Advisor

Re: query on top and mount command

hey Matti,

thanks a lot for your post. Just as you posted I finished reading and understanding some articles on the net to understand vmstat command and wat it does. your post always contains info more than what u can find under the sun.
:)
Just as I finished understanding the command, peak prod hours were over and my vmstat command resulted in full load of idle runs.
i will run it again tomorrow during prod hours (around 8 hrs).
so does it make sense to run the command like

user1@odbs1:~> vmstat 5 >> vmstat.txt &

user1@odbs2:~> vmstat 5 >> vmstat.txt &

and leave it running? it wont consume CPU or memory resources and affect the production servers! am i right?
and later i can kill the process vmstat?
Modris Bremze
Esteemed Contributor

Re: query on top and mount command

vmstat, as any other application, needs some CPU cycles and RAM to work, but that is probably not very significant. You could also try and schedule (crontab) it to run every, say, 5mins for 30secs or so. Also, remember to check the disk space before you leave something running, that also writes/logs continuously to disk.
iinfi1
Super Advisor

Re: query on top and mount command

i ran vmstat during production hours today.
i find that majority of the si in both nodes of the oracle db are zero but off n on show figures ranging in the range of 50-140.
so is zero all through. so that means there is no read from the disk.
i find that in both nodes the memory free column shows free memory in the range of 300000-500000 which means there is 0.3-0.5 Gigs of free memory always.
during peak load the cpu > wa column continuously shows figures in the range of 50-90 for 20-30 minute periods on one node while its idle on the other RAC node.
the fact is that free memory on the system is always 300-500 mb during peak loads. is that strong enough a reason to increase the memory in the two nodes?