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rsync from local to remote fs

 
DeafFrog
Valued Contributor

rsync from local to remote fs

Hi Gurus ,

 

is it possible to use local fs ( hp ux v3) to replicate to fs on another system(hp ux v3) using rsync.

Is it heavy on system , if croned.

What about if the source systems fs changes very frequently that needs to be synced to remote .

Any specific consideration , is it advisiable ?

 

Pls share working syntax examples and configuration if some has had this working .

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 

FrogIsDeaf
2 REPLIES
DeafFrog
Valued Contributor

Re: rsync from local to remote fs

oki ...heres the syntax that nearly does whad the requirement is :

 

rsync -av --progress -avzq --delete --rsync-path=/usr/local/bin/rsync /LV_SNAP/ root@apple1:/backup/RSYNC/

 

but i still want to know , what if the source contains many  files and too many of them chage too frequently ...is it suitable for high work load production.

 

 

 

 

Thanks,

FrogIsDeaf
Bill Hassell
Honored Contributor

Re: rsync from local to remote fs

>> but i still want to know , what if the source contains many  files and too many of them chage too frequently ...is it suitable for high work load production.

 

Certainly rsync is appropriate. It doesn't matter if all of them change every minute or none change for weeks. rsync is the tool of choice to minimize the task to sync two directories. I have used it to copy thousands of files totalling terabytes of data. Now, it is not as fast as ftp, but ftp is limited to one directory at a time -- and there are no skip options for ftp -- every file is copied whether it needs to or not.

 

If you use ssh as the transport, it will be slower than remsh but take a look at rsync daemon as a way to speed up the transfers. Also note that you will get faster throughput by running rsync for separate directories at the same time, at least 3 or 4. That will keep the network really busy so be sure to use dedicated LAN connections to avoid slowing down production connections.



Bill Hassell, sysadmin