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sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

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Vishu
Trusted Contributor

sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

Hi Guys,

Can anyone tell me the difference between sudo, csu and sroot. How they are differ from each other.

Thanks
Vishu
6 REPLIES
OldSchool
Honored Contributor

Re: sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

can you elaborate as to what "csu" and "sroot" are as I've not heard of either and google doesn't seem to have an relevant hits either?
Michael Steele_2
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

Hi

a) don't know the acronym 'csu'.

b) Know of 'sroot' as a proprietory application from AT&T that is not as good as 'sudo'. I used 'sroot' at AT&T in 2000 but did not see it when I was there in 2007. In 2007 the AT&T department that I was a part of used 'sudo'.

c) 'sudo' beleaved by many to be the superior product. There is a /etc/sudousers configuration file that can be a little difficult to set up. You define groups of users and groups of command sets.

Both b and c log all the commands issued. This is the many reason for both, as root by itself leaves no log or footprint accept in the history file and this can be easily played with.
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OldSchool
Honored Contributor

Re: sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

fyi, I believe you'll find that sudo doesn't "log all" commands. for example

"sudo date" would show in the log.

while "sudo sh" would also show up in the log, and commands run within that shell won't log. If that's the desired outcome, you need to look at something like PowerBroker, or sudosh2 (I think it was) was mentioned here.

see this thread:

http://forums13.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/questionanswer.do?threadId=1342438
Basheer_2
Trusted Contributor

Re: sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

Vishu,

sudo is very easy to configure and very good tool for giving controlled access to non-root users.

for eg:

you can delegate all printing jobs to an operator.

Which one is better: Depends on your needs.
Sajjad Sahir
Honored Contributor

Re: sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

Dear vishu

what do u mean by csu and sroot?

sudo allows a permitted user to execute a command as the superuser or another user
sudo determines who is an authorized user by consulting the file /etc/sudoers

thanks and regards

Sajjad Sahir
Steven E. Protter
Exalted Contributor

Re: sudo v/s csu v/s sroot

Shalom,

csu do you mean su?
sroot never heard of it

sudo is a recognized method of granting commands or command groups normally reserved for root to normal users.

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Steven E Protter
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