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vista/fedora7 dual boot

check hung
Advisor

vista/fedora7 dual boot

I have a HP a6200n that comes with vista. I used Vista utility to create a partition L on C drive and formatted it in NTFS. When I try to install Fedora 7 it would not recognize the L drive and insist on installing on the C drive. How can I get around this? Thanks
12 REPLIES
Vitaly Karasik_1
Honored Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

You should delete second partition and just leave free space on your harddisk - linux installer will create partition and format it for linux.
~sesh
Esteemed Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Linux cannot use an NTFS partition to install itself. Linux filesystem(s) is/are different, viz. ext2, ext3, reiserfs, etc.

As Vitaly pointed out you will need to remove the partition you created for Linux as NTFS, and leave it unused. Then start the Fedora setup, and select the unused space on the hard drive for installation.
Steven E. Protter
Exalted Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Shalom,

Note that if its a low end HP Pc it might not run Linux at all. If its not certified by HP for Linux, stop now.


If it is certified, it is best to get Vista running in a partition and then install Linux into a second partition, using grub to be the boot manager.

SEP
Steven E Protter
Owner of ISN Corporation
http://isnamerica.com
http://hpuxconsulting.com
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Twitter: http://twitter.com/hpuxlinux
Founder http://newdatacloud.com
John Collier
Esteemed Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Just a word of encouragement (for what it's worth).

I happen to have an HP notebook that is running the same configuration that you are attempting to set up.

My steps were pretty much what you have been advised here:

1. Resize the primary M$ Windoze partition (I also used the built-in tools for this as you did)

2. Leave the newly created 'extra' space unformatted (AKA - 'raw')

3. Inform Fedora 7 that it should use the unused disk space (that it will find all on it's own) for a place to install.

4. Since this is obviously one of your earlier attempts to install F7, I would advise letting the installer handle the file system. Just take the defaults that it suggests and you will probably be fine at this stage in your journey.

5. Install GRUB as your primary boot loader for both systems. This will replace the information on sector 0 of your HDD and will handle booting both Windoze and Linux by giving you a choice when you power on.

While I appreciate Steven's caution on stopping the process on non-Linux certified equipment simply to save some new folks a headache or two, after reviewing what I was able to find on your desktop system I feel fairly confident that you will have little to no problems with F7 on that system. There may be something on there that I don't recognize right off that will be a bit of a pain, but most of your hardware should simply work.

Good luck and enjoy the journey!
"I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good, therefore, that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again." Stephen Krebbet, 1793-1855
check hung
Advisor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Thanks everybody for the input.
The machine has a single scsi disk of 360g. Originally I shrinked 140g out of it and started installing Fedora. I stopped when I saw this screen:
-------------
Select the drive to use for this installation
x sda 343397 mb ATAST3360320AS

What drive would you like to boot this installation from
sda 343397 mb ATAST3360320AS
--------------
both sda... lines were dimmed and there were no other selection choices. This made me think it will try to install on the beginning of the hard drive. Then I formatted the 140g into drive L and tried again with the same result. Come to think of it Fedora may mean "hard drive" by the word "drive" in the first question. I suppose the screens after this may show more details of disk recognized by Fedora? Can I use Fedora to reformat the L drive in later screen(s) then?
thanks

cch
John Collier
Esteemed Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Let me see if I can clear this up a little bit.


The days of pre-formatting a hard disk drive prior to installation are pretty much dead and gone. Most of the 'modern' operating systems will look at your physical drives and then search for raw, unused pieces/parts as a preferred place to install themselves.

Basically what you are doing when you pre-format a partition using a M$ proprietary format is to tell any other operating system out there that the partition is spoken for and in use. It is kind of like telling it "Micro$oft is using this area and NOBODY else can have it!"

By default, Linux does not read or write to NTFS. If you want to add this capability later on, you are welcome to do so but it is NOT a standard feature.

I readily admit that I do not have a SCSI disk in any of my boxes and I have never attempted to load an OS on one. The best I have done so far was a SATA drive in my notebook. There are probably others out here that can point you in better directions regarding the use of SCSI drives.

What I would suggest is to use the same M$ utility that you used to shrink the partition in the first place and simply remove the formatting from the space you want to install your F7 in.

Once you have removed the NTFS file system from the partition you wish to use for Fedora, then you boot the box with the F7 install media and check to see if it now gives you different options than you saw the first time around.

If you do not have clean, unformatted space available for the install to find, then it will definitely complicate the install process.

Hope this information helps!
"I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good, therefore, that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again." Stephen Krebbet, 1793-1855
Benjamin Mathias Fuente
Frequent Advisor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

use acronis disk director for workstation... there's a trial version arround the internet for vista and it could be useful for ya.

pd: vista really sucks. i dont know how the pc fab's can include it in theirs new equipment..... what a bunch of dumbasses!!
Nuwan Alwis
Valued Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

i dont see any issues about ur HDD will matter such as SCSI or SATA for the fedora installtion . If u have 2 pattitions just keep the partition that you are planing to install fedora as partitioned space and boot up from the fedora media.
in the gui mode of the installation it will show your physical disk and u can continue with use unused disk space option,i suggest you to continue with manual partition option(Disk Druid). there you will will see ur unpartitioned space. You can assign on your file system mount points such as /boot, /root
and swap....
by doing it in this way u ensure ur other data will be safe.

Nuwan J
check hung
Advisor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Success.
I deleted the newly formatted NTFS partition and install again. It was a piece of cake.
Now I want to boot up on Vista as the default. How should I modify the grub file? I suspect changing default to 1. Please advise. The grub.conf file is this:
-------------------------
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,2)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
default=0
timeout=5
splashimage=(hd0,2)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
hiddenmenu
title Fedora (2.6.21-1.3194.fc7)
root (hd0,2)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.21-1.3194.fc7 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.21-1.3194.fc7.img
title Other
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
-----------------------
Also how do I interrupt the Vista boot process to switch to Fedora?
Thanks
~sesh
Esteemed Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

That's great.

You could make Vista the default by:

1. default=1
OR
2. Paste the 3 lines (starting from "title Other") above title Fedora (2.6.21-1.3194.fc7)

You could even change "Other" to "Windows Vista".

You can find instructions to boot Linux / Fedora from Vista Boot loader using the instructions given on:
http://port25.technet.com/archive/2006/10/13/Using-Vista_2700_s-Boot-Manager-to-Boot-Linux-and-Dual-Booting-with-BitLocker-Protection-with-TPM-Support.aspx

However, I would recommend that you stick with Grub Boot loader.
~sesh
Esteemed Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Sorry for the split post.

To make Windows Vista the default, I would recommend that you cut+paste

title Other
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1

above title Fedora (2.6.21-1.3194.fc7)

The advantage is, you will have the default option displayed above Fedora. If you use default=1, the option on the bottom will be highlighted by default. It is only logical to move the cursor down to select the OS we want.
John Collier
Esteemed Contributor

Re: vista/fedora7 dual boot

Congrats on getting through that one.

Nice feeling to get it accomplished, isn't it?

By the way, I know you are a bit new to the forums, but you might want to start showing your appreciation for all of the time that people donate here by assigning points to the answers they provide. Right now it looks like you have never done so.

"I have assigned points to 0 of 19 responses to my questions"

If you will follow this link ( http://forums1.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/pageList.do?userId=CA1311682&listType=unassigned&forumId=1 ) you will find all of your questions with posts that have not been rewarded.

To help understand the point system, you might want to read the following excerpt:

"When you return to view the answer, please rate it by assigning points on a scale of 1-10. To assign points, simply login and click the dropdown points menu next to each reply. Use the following scale when rating a response:

N/A: The reply was a clarification to my original question
1-3: The answer didn't help answer my question, but thanks anyhow!
4-7: The answer helped with a portion of my question, but I still need help.
8-10: The answer has solved my problem completely! I'm a happy camper!

WHY SHOULD YOU DO THIS?
There are 3 reasons why we feel rating replies is such an important feature:

1.) Others have taken time to help you, so please give them credit for their help.
2.) Your rating will help your peers earn points toward their Forums status, and you will validate the quality of the solution you've received.
3.) Other readers will understand which answer best solved a problem, enriching the community knowledge being shared."
"I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good, therefore, that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again." Stephen Krebbet, 1793-1855