Tape Libraries and Drives
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Waugh
Frequent Advisor

Drive

Hi,

What is the diff between LTO and DLT tape drive

Reagrds
Rkumr
3 REPLIES
Ganesan R
Honored Contributor

Re: Drive

Hi rkumar,

Here you can find detailed informations and differences.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_Tape-Open

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Linear_Tape
Best wishes,

Ganesh.
Steven E. Protter
Exalted Contributor

Re: Drive

Shalom,

Capacity, media type and cost.

LTO has a pretty high capacity.

What you want depends on the application.

Both if purchased from HP are suitable for use as boot/system recovery devices.

Plan to attach either to its own scsi channel without daisy chain to achieve maximum performance.

SEP
Steven E Protter
Owner of ISN Corporation
http://isnamerica.com
http://hpuxconsulting.com
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Founder http://newdatacloud.com
Bill Hassell
Honored Contributor

Re: Drive

LTO drives (HP uses the name Ultrium), are much higher performance and capacity than DLT. LTOs are the next generation in large scale tape storage. There are currently 4 levels of LTO available and in development. The biggest mistake made is selecting LTO drives is to look only at capacity. LTO-3 and LTO-4 place enormous speed requirements on the host. In most cases with old equipment (especially old disks), the system cannot send data to write on the tape fast enough and this degrades performance severely. With LTO-3 needing 80 MB/s and LTO-4 needing 120 MB/s (minimum, uncompressed), many disk subsystems are just not fast enough.

HP Ultrium drives have a slow down mechanism called data rate matching and the tape literally slows down to about 30 MB/s. If the data is still too slow, the drive must stop, back up, and wait for data to arrive. This causes very serious wear on the tape and heads of the drive, and throughput drops to just a few MB/s.

Be sure to choose a tape technology that is best for your environment.


Bill Hassell, sysadmin