Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 

Sizing LUNs for Oracle

Occasional Contributor

Sizing LUNs for Oracle

Hi HAppy new year!!

I have a VA with Oracle and i need to knows which is the best practices to sizing the Luns.
Anybody has a white papers?

i have 2TB but i dont know how configure the size of the luns..1Gb, 5gb, 20gb,40 gb ?

thanks
4 REPLIES
Honored Contributor

Re: Sizing LUNs for Oracle

Hi,

First a happy new year to you!

Oracle like as much spindles (disks) as it can get, but a lun is not a disk, it is an logical disk so i do not think it matters for Oralce how big they are.
I think it depents on the flexability you need in assigining disks to servers. If you create a few big luins you and you need to make changes to the sizes ( online jfs ) you are better of using smaller luns (10 GB).

Gideon
Honored Contributor

Re: Sizing LUNs for Oracle

Hi,

Main consideration will be ease of administration becoz in SAn kind of environment it really does not make much difference

Sunil
*** Dream as if you'll live forever. Live as if you'll die today ***
Occasional Advisor

Re: Sizing LUNs for Oracle

Hello,

When considering the administration issue one has to think about how much time is actually spent administering luns.

Performance is a constant issue so I would evaluate the types of reads and writes and attempt to devise a strategy that will increase the amount of queues/channels to the data. This would imply more smaller luns rather than fewer larger luns. 10GB - 20GB luns are good. Note that a VA uses 2 reducancy groups to store and access data. Data is spread across the redundancy group and therefore across the spindles. This also implies that the array should have more smaller and faster drives as opposed to larger slower drives. But VAs (especially with large cache) are fast anyway...
Exalted Contributor

Re: Sizing LUNs for Oracle

Smaller is usually more manageable.

I base my size based on a multiple of the size of my largest data file.

Also take into consideration that oracle recommends even on a SAN that data and redo logs be raid 1 or raid 10, not raid 5.

SEP
Steven E Protter
Owner of ISN Corporation
http://isnamerica.com
http://hpuxconsulting.com
Sponsor: http://hpux.ws
Twitter: http://twitter.com/hpuxlinux
Founder http://newdatacloud.com