System Administration
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

process level information from sar data file or any other way

 
SOLVED
Go to solution
Highlighted
Honored Contributor

process level information from sar data file or any other way

Red Hat Linux Advanced Server release 2.1AS
2.4.9-e.72enterprise #1 SMP Tue Jul 3 21:57:23 EDT 2007 i686 unknown

/var/log/saxx file has lot of information? Does that have process logging if i want find out which process was running at what time and what was the resource usage? Any other alternatives to get this informations
4 REPLIES 4
Highlighted
Honored Contributor

Re: process level information from sar data file or any other way

Nope.
"The difference between me and you? I will read the man page." and "Respect the hat." and "You could just do a search on ITRC, you don't need to start a thread on a topic that's been answered 100 times already." Oh, and "What. no points???"
Highlighted
Honored Contributor

Re: process level information from sar data file or any other way

Collect for linux (collectl) may give you that information.
Por que hacerlo dificil si es posible hacerlo facil? - Why do it the hard way, when you can do it the easy way?
Highlighted
Honored Contributor

Re: process level information from sar data file or any other way

Just checked, on a installed system, if you run collectl -sZ you get process information, you can also do the same with the -p (playback) to display saved information.
Por que hacerlo dificil si es posible hacerlo facil? - Why do it the hard way, when you can do it the easy way?
Highlighted
Occasional Contributor
Solution

Re: process level information from sar data file or any other way

You can also playback a saved set of data with --top, showing you the top n (5 by default) processes during each interval. If you have a particular timeframe in mind, just use --from and --thru to focus the range.

If you'd like to see more details about memory utilization just use --procopts m to change the format of the output and if process i/o is enabled in your kernel you'll see that as part of the standard display OR specify --procopts i and see more detail I/O counters for each process.

-mark