General
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Re: RH 5.5 32 bit and number / size of java engines.

 
SOLVED
Go to solution
TwoProc
Honored Contributor

Re: RH 5.5 32 bit and number / size of java engines.

Thanks again - one more question then. Are the libraries of code(jars, etc) that you've received from Oracle's Weblogic compiled as 64 bit programs for you, or is this not an issue with engines that executing in a virtual machine be ther 32 bit or 64? Seems like it would matter to me. Of course, I realize you could recompile your own code, but I'm wondering about the seeded code you get from Oracle...
We are the people our parents warned us about --Jimmy Buffett
Alzhy
Honored Contributor

Re: RH 5.5 32 bit and number / size of java engines.

TP, this is what I gathered from our environment. We have 32bit WL 10.3 installed -- it is bundled with Sun Java and Jrockit 32bit. But out apps folks do not use the bundled and outdated java versions in their deployments/java code. Instead - we use a common JDK release linked as follows /usr/java/current -> /usr/java/jdk1.6.0_24 (or to whatever is the latest and greatest) - and our installation is always 64bit. And they simply use javac out of this installation to build their java objects.

As far as the bundled jars (in lib, demo and plugins, etc) with WL10.3 32 bit -- I really could not tell. From what little I know, the jars are archived bits of java objects -- I do not know how to determine bitness of them objects. Maybe use "jar" to extract a few? Again -- I'm no weblogic infrastructure expert -- just relaying what my clients are telling me but I observe though - the running Java proces out of our WL10.3 servers are 64bit JVMs.

Hakuna Matata.
Andrew C Fieldsend
Respected Contributor

Re: RH 5.5 32 bit and number / size of java engines.

All compiled Java code is platform-independent, unless it links to JNI libraries, which are necessarily platform-specific.

The Java language specification was deliberately written to remove all questions of word length and bit-endianness from consideration so that any Java program would be "write once, run everywhere".

If your WebLogic application is written in pure Java, it will make no difference whether you run it on a 32- or 64-bit JVM (other than the speed and memory usage).