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Network design problem

Deniz Serim
Occasional Visitor

Network design problem

Hi,

I am in the process of designing a network for a small start up company coposed of approx 120 nodes across 5 network segments on two floors. 3 segments with approx. On thefirst floor, 50 users will use a wireless connection for which I am planning to use 3 HP 520wl Access Points. On the second floor, the remaining 70 users will be wired as they require more bandwidth and performance. I am thinking of using HP 2800 series switches but not sure. Would 5300xl be a better solution? Can I connect the access points to the switches on the top floor without using a seperate switch in between?

My final question is what device is used to connect a 2800 or 5300xl series switch to the internet (T1 connection).
5 REPLIES
The Real MD
Valued Contributor

Re: Network design problem

you can connect the WAP to the switch on the top floor but consider connectivity, the more concrete and steel the signal the signal has to penetrate the more the signal will attenuate (diminish over distance). Would it be acceptable to just run a cable from the top floor to the first floor and connect your WAP their. have you considered the security implications of wireless. its also worth considering a second WAP for the first floor in case the first WAP fails.

apologies I dont know about the other items.

but I hope this helps.

Martin.
Victor_68
Advisor

Re: Network design problem

Hi,

"Can I connect the access points to the switches on the top floor without using a seperate switch in between?"

It could be a good idea to take a look at the 700wl series for the wireless security.

http://www.hp.com/rnd/products/wireless/700wlseries/summary.htm

Cheers

Victor
OLARU Dan
Trusted Contributor

Re: Network design problem

You need an IP router to connect to Internet, and co-operation with an ISP (Internet Services Provider). Since 5300XL can do IP routing, I would recommend it. Plus it is a modular switch, so your client can grow his network over time.

For connection to the Internet, your ISP will most surely put some equipment on your premises. My ISP has a Cisco 1600 series router on my premises and it is his job to set his router to do WAN. I use a fractional E1 (512 kbps out of 2048 kbps maximum available) and Frame Relay. Your 5300XL will be linked to the ISP router (through 10Base-T ethernet or 100Base-TX FastEthernet). You do not need more, since maximum E1 is just 2.048 Mbps.

Drop me a line here if you need more: dan_olaru at yahoo dot com

HTH,
Dan
Stuart Teo
Trusted Contributor

Re: Network design problem

Hi,

Which model to deploy depends on your plan. How much scalability do you need? What is the cost/port today and what will the future cost/port be if you decide on a particular model/design.

The new HP ProCurve 600 Redundant and External Power Supply (J8168A) allows you to deliver PoE so you might want to consider that option whether you use the 2800 or the 5300xl series.
If a problem can be fixed, there's nothing to worry. If a problem can't be fixed, worrying ain't gonna help. Bottom line: don't worry.
STEVEN LEE_12
Frequent Advisor

Re: Network design problem

On the question of whether you can connect the APs on the 1st floor to switches on the 2nd floor, the answer is yes and no. Yes, you can connect the APS directly to the switches. But you have to remember the restriction of distance between the APs and the switches.

Cat 5 cabling allows a distance of up to 100 metres. Cat 6 may go longer in theory but not recommended as Cat 6 was designed for bigger bandwidth rather than distance.

If you are using fibre optic then this will not be a problem.

So if your APs are located more than 100 metres from the switches, you will need to put in another switch in somewhere the middle to shorthen the distances.