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Building UX Server for Dev Environment

 
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Regular Advisor

Building UX Server for Dev Environment

Hello.

I am asked to build a new UNIX Server for Development environment before we could ask the high level experts to build production environment. Could you please let me know what all must I have to know and the steps inorder to build ux server?

Thank you!
9 REPLIES 9
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Honored Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

hemm... you would need the hardware and the media CD if it's a cold installation :D

regards,
Sandy
I never think of the future. It comes soon enough.
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Regular Advisor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

Thanks - After it?
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Honored Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

Well.. configure the hostname and IP Address of the server and after that it would be depend on the application. You should check the requirement of the application for: Filesystem (how much disk and how big they need), kernel values.

If this is going to be deployed on a similar hardware for production, then I suggest you do a make_tape_recovery to make you easier deploy on the production server.

Regards,
Sandy
I never think of the future. It comes soon enough.
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Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

A general answer to a very general question.

Install the OS and configure all settings to satisfy your needs.


Use this for reference:

http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90950/index.html

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

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Honored Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

Panchalp,

How to upgrade to HP-UX 11i v3
http://h20338.www2.hp.com/hpux11i/cache/535975-0-0-0-121.html

You can download or to watch the webcast.

This Webcast describes how to upgrade an installed system running HP-UX to HP-UX 11i v3, providing 1. a generic understanding on best practices for upgrading your HP-UX operating system, and 2. specifically, how to update from whatever release you have installed today to v3.

WK
Problem never ends, you must know how to fix it
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Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

I am going to give you some rather unconventional advice and your developers are going to hate it BUT it is nonetheless very good advice. You want your development and test machines to be something of a dog. You should intentionally undersize these boxes in terms of CPU, memory, and other resources. You should also avoid lightning-fast drive arrays. They should also be tuned somewhat sub-optimally. You are going to hear complaints that compiles and links are slow. Ignore them. Those times are a tiny fraction (<< 1%) of the development cycle. The benefit from this approach is that you avoid scaling problems when moving to production. If their algorithms and indexing schemes are good enough to perform well on a dog then they will probably survice in a scaled-up production environment.
If it ain't broke, I can fix that.
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Exalted Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

Shalom,

Two schools of thought, both valid. A. Clay will say that it should be slower than production so that any code that works very well on production.

Due to the need for testing kernel parameter sets and performance issues. I believe the system should be realistic. It should have the same amount of memory so that tuning configuration for production can be developed on it.

Hardware wise, I also advise having the same class of hardware. Maybe not as many cpus, however any variances from production can lead to unexpected surprises.

SEP
Steven E Protter
Owner of ISN Corporation
http://isnamerica.com
http://hpuxconsulting.com
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Founder http://newdatacloud.com
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Honored Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment


I must second Clay's advice. The development server should be slower than the one used in production. If you're buying new, simply buy the *slowest* processor you can get, and don't put too much of them. The money you'll save can then be invested in a faster production server.

Consider strongly buying the real HP C compilers. They're not that expensive and if you're an ISV you can even qualify for a free licence. Gcc works and works well for most cases, but it does not make code that is as optimized. Read the compiler documentation, and don't hesitate to use its advanced features such as leak detection.

Very important: train your developers in using the Caliper optimization software. It's available at http://www.hp.com/go/caliper. It's free for HP-UX. Our developpers have benefited A LOT from this tool. They found loopholes and bugs that would have been very hard to detect otherwise.

Be sure to install good text editors (emacs, nedit, whatever) since your developpers will definitely NOT enjoy using the vanilla vi editor. Some better ease of use can be achived by using an editor running on the PC, saving files on shares exported using Samba.

If you have one or two developpers you'll probably won't need much source control. But if you have many, offer them a source repository such as SVN. The SVN client and server run well on HP-UX, I can provide some tips to compile them if you need any, but to be honest you'll have less trouble getting an SVN server running on Linux.

Good luck
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Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Building UX Server for Dev Environment

>Clay: You want your development and test machines to be something of a dog. ... You are going to hear complaints that compiles and links are slow. Ignore them.

If you are separating out build machines from development and test, I would disagree with you. You want the compiles and links to go as fast as possible. In the lab we have massive build pools to get them done as fast as possible.

>Olivier: Consider strongly buying the real HP C compilers.

The real IPF C compiler needs a real computer with lots of speed and memory. For A.06.15, we say flat out, we require maxdsiz_64bits to be 4 Gb, to handle the highest optimization settings.

>Read the compiler documentation, and don't hesitate to use its advanced features such as leak detection.

There is also Cadvise to comment on your code quality and +check= for runtime checking.
http://www.hp.com/go/cpp
http://www.hp.com/go/wdb
http://www.hp.com/go/cadvise